Category Archives: Alumni Events/Activities

For all camp service and social events and activities

Alumni Weekend 2011 Photos by Gord Fleming

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150761136685118.722759.804295117

Bowling for Bursary 2011

Bowlerama West
5429 Dundas Street West
Toronto, ON

April 30, 2011 – 7:30 pm

Come on out for a fun evening with alumni members and earn some money for the HSRSA Bursary. Bowling for Bursary 2011 is a fundraiser with all proceeds going to the bursary fund. Bowling for Bursary 2011 is open to all Alumni members and their friends and family. No bowling ability or experience required.

Cost is $20 per person – this will give you 2 games of 10 pin and temporary ownership of a fine pair of bowling shoes.

Organize a team of 4 to 6 bowlers or come alone and we will match you with a team.

We encourage persons who are not able to come in person to sponsor a bowler and thus contribute to the Bursary fund.

If you are planning to attend, please RSVP by April 25th to Thunderbird@hsrsa.ca. If you have a team, please provide the name of the team and the number of team members (team member names would be good too).

If you wish sponsor a bowler, please send a cheque payable to Haliburton Scout Reserve Staff Alumni Association, to:
Bowling for Bursary
c/o 6 Harbord Cres
Ajax, ON L1S 4E1

Hungry? Thirsty? Plan to head just down the road to Scruffy Murphy’s, 225 The East Mall, Etobicoke, after the event.

2011 HSRSA Poker Night!

Saturday, March 5 at 7:00pm, Franklin Horner Community Centre

HSRSA Poker Night is a fundraiser Texas Hold ‘Em tournament with all proceeds going to the bursary fund. HSRSA Poker Night is open to all Alumni members, previous and current staff members, and their friends and family. Participants must be over 19 years of age.

Buy-in is $20 per game. Prize payouts of 50% of buy-ins, with 50% going to the bursary fund. 2nd place wins their $20 buy-in. 1st place wins the rest!

If you are planning to attend, please RSVP to bursary@hsrsa.ca

Franklin Horner Community Centre is located at 432 Horner Avenue, Etobicoke, ON, M8W 2B3. Click here for a map to the Centre. Plenty of parking is available behind Centre, off Beta St.

Gallery

2010 Trails Weekend Photos

This gallery contains 53 photos.

A selection of beautiful photos taken by Paul Daly (73-78). Watch the slideshow or click on the individual photos below for larger versions.

2010 Pee Pond Bridge

By Katrina Angel (89-90)

The Pee Pond Bridge was built during Trails Weekend 1996.  The previous passage across the pond, on the Coopers Loop trail between Moore and Mislaid Lakes, was a beaver dam. However, nature was doing its work and the dam was soon to be impassable, so a new crossing was needed.  Trails Weekend, complete with many ready hands, provided the perfect opportunity for such a large-scale project.

Katina Angel checking out the deteriorated Pee Pond Bridge

Ab Morrow (75-87,92-99), Camp Ranger, had the bridge designed, and materials were ready to go.  Using the camp truck, lumber and other supplies were driven up the Hurst Lake road, along the road to Moore Lake, to the Mislaid cut-off.  From there, we carried 16-foot long stringers to the Pee Pond – not an easy task on the trail working around trees. Once we reached the Pond, we saw that a tree had fallen across the pond essentially where the bridge was to go.  A few other trees standing in the area provided opportunity for a much simpler construction.  The decision was made to drop a second tree, from the other side, and to use the two logs as the base of the bridge.  Kevin Bell, who is now the current camp ranger, had just acquired his own chainsaw, and was more than happy to put it to use. Some of those 16-foot boards were used as a frame on top of those logs, but the rest needed to be carried back out to the trucks.  One design challenge was getting onto the bridge, as the log base was fairly high off the ground.  The solution – a fully accessible wheelchair ramp!

I’ve attended many Trails Weekends, and the ’96 Bridge Build has to have been my favourite to date.  Typically, we break into groups and work on various sections of trail over the weekend, mostly clearing and flagging.  In ’96, we were all working together, which lead to the kind fraternization that has made us all love our time at HSR.   The weather also cooperated, giving us warm sunny days, warm enough to strip down to a t-shirt when working.  The evening socializing, of the kind not to be seen in HSR again (and most likely rightly so), only added to the fun. There is also a satisfaction that comes with building something solid, and big.  You can say “I built that”, where as there isn’t anything particularly awe-inspiring about “I cut back those branches and put that trail marker up”.

But time has taken its toll. Just as the previously used beaver dam rotted out, the logs that formed with base of this bridge were in the water, and also rotted with time. Inspected during Trails Weekend 2009, it was clear that the bridge would not be passable for much longer. Plans and discussions began for replacement of the bridge, including options for how to build and fund it.  By Trails 2010, a plan was in place to replace the bridge in 2011.

However, the current bridge was not expected to survive another winter’s effects. Saturday morning of Trails Weekend, a fairly large work team was sent to Pee Pond to flag a temporary trail around the pond, to bypass the bridge. The idea was to make the Coopers Loop trail to Mislaid still useable until the new bridge was completed. The team decided to spilt into two and work from opposite ends to meet in the middle.  We expected tough work creating new trail, where none has been before.  To our surprise, we found the area fairly clear and the two teams met up fairly quickly. We realized that extending the trail around the pond would only add a few minutes of hiking time, and eliminate the need for replacing bridges over time. Back at the Hub at lunch, the idea was pitched to Kevin Bell, who had final decision as Camp Director. As expected, Kevin was happy to not need to be replacing bridges every 15 or so years. A smaller work team returned to the area to create a now-permanent trail, while others moved on to other needed projects.

Tim Collier Removing the old bridge treads

When the new trail was complete, only one task remained – ensuring the bridge was fully impassable, so as not to pose a hazard to hikers who might choose a rickety bridge over a bit of a walk. As much fun as demolition is, it is still a little painful to destroy something that you had a hand in building, and that holds such warm memories. But, unless we had some way to set up a camera to capture video of people falling in the drink so that we could laugh at them, it needed to be done.  Let me tell you, pulling apart a wobbly bridge without falling off or having it collapse underneath you is not the easiest task.  We had a few close calls, but we all managed to stay above water.  In order to maintain enough structure for us to get across, we pulled off as many decking boards as deemed possible.  With the water rotting the logs and often frame from underneath, it was the structure held together by the decking boards which was holding the bridge together in many areas.  As we worked our way closer to shore, we removed more boards and frame sections.  The terminal section was completed rotted, and thus ceremoniously demolished.  The final section removed was the wheelchair ramp.  It is expected that the water freezing around what remains will complete the demolition.

Once upon a time there was a bridge....

We had a great time working on the bridge again, 14 years later.  Once again, it gave a group of us the pleasure to work together closely, and tease each other, all day long. A member of the demolition team, Jonathan Pereira (10), who had been an SIT this past summer, pointed that he was one-year old when the bridge was built.  It is amazing he remained dry, after a comment like that. The weekend gave a young’en like Jonathan, and an (apparently) old-timer like me a chance to get to know each other.  The evening socializing gave current and recent staff members and alumni additional time to hang out together. I have to thank the bridge for giving me two wonderful weekends of friendship and camaraderie. Comparing our experiences at HSR in the ‘90s to now would be like comparing apples and softballs, so it is not fair to compare the ’96 Bridge Build to recent weekends. I can say that the ’10 Bridge Demolish year will go down as my favourite Trails Weekend of the new era of HSR volunteering.

I hope to see you there in 2011.

See also the main 2010 Trails Weekend posting.

Gallery

2010 Trails Weekend

This gallery contains 1 photos.

The rain gods spared us this year and gave us a glorious weekend in which to revel in the fall scenery and get lots of work done. A large contingent of alumni and current/recent staff filled the hub on Friday … Continue reading

Gallery

2010 Cricket Match

This gallery contains 1 photos.

NEITHER RUNNIN’ NORWALKIN’ – ALUMNI UNABLE TO LICK STAFF (AT CRICKET) by Gord Fleming (84-88) – Staff Alumni Cricket Team Coach HALIBURTON – The regrettable list of cancelled championships that already includes the WWI-Era Grey Cups, the 1919 Stanley Cup, … Continue reading

Gallery

2009 Pub Night

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Advertised as a chance to get a great start on a new year, or to mess up on all those New Year’s resolutions at once, the 2009 Pub Nite was held once again in the Conservatory at the Duke Of … Continue reading

Gallery

2009 Trails Weekend

Volunteers arriving at the re-scheduled 2009 Trails Weekend on a chilly Friday evening may have been surprised to find fellow volunteers crammed into the hub kitchen around two tables, basking in the warmth emanating from the open doors of the … Continue reading

Gallery

2009 Reunion Weekend

This gallery contains 24 photos.

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night ….. and Late Morning Alumni Weekend was like a lot of weekends during the summer of 2009. Weather forecasts were largely tentative—promising cooler than normal temperatures and the likelihood of precipitation. Amongst HSRSA … Continue reading